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to start all over. >> eva rowe's parents were among the 15 who died that day in texas city. it was the worst workplace accident in this country in 16 years. >> these things do not have to happen. they are preventable. they're predictable, and people do not have to die because they're earning a living. >> welcome to 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm leslie stahl. oil is the engine that drives our economy. and as oil becomes scarcer, the push to discover and develop new sources becomes increasingly dangerous. this edition examines two recent disasters in the oil industry with a great deal in common: the deepwater horizon rig in the gulf of mexico and the refinery at texas city, which suffered explosions five years apart. they were both operated by bp. and in both cases, 60 minutes looked at whether bp's cost saving measures may have had deadly consequences. first we'll look at the biggest off shore oil spill in history, the blowout of the deepwater horizon drilling rig in 2010. critical revelations in the disaster have come from one of the last crewmen to escape the rig, mike williams,
in new york city's times square, i'm melissa lee. altitude sickness. stocks pull back. monopoly money. if you had a billion dollars, would you put into houses? we have a guest who is doing just that. and jpmorgan versus citigroup. while karen is cheating on jamie dimon. first, let's get to our top four trades. pete? >> ups. i was focusing on them for multiple reasons. that tnt deal for tnt express over in europe, obviously $7 billion is now back to ups. they are going to have to use that in different ways. the dividend, the other share buy-bayi buy-backs. it's pulled back slightly since that time. but this remains a very, very interesting stock. and today, the options got even more interesting. seller of april calls, buyer of the july upside calls. this is that roll from one out to the other, looking for a little bit of time but more upside to happen. >> and grasso, you were watching levels on the s&p 500, the biggest decline so far this year. >> right. you look at the weekly level. you have to look at the weekly low from last week. 1496. closed right below that. we haven't seen that
. and on thursday, the fall fashion week kicks off in new york city. on friday, we'll find out if the u.s. is importing or exporting more trade or goods. next week, paul krugman will be here. keep it right here where we are, on the money. have a great
quarter. maybe some positive news there. tina, from citi, she's been taking a look at what the president has to do, i guess, in his second term or what he's expected to do. what i loved was your point, how did you put it? fiscal deals or compromise tend to disappear in washington like -- >> the bermuda triangle. >> you don't have high hopes for compromise here? >> no. most politicians in the developed world, and the u.s. very much within this, it's not going to see -- i'm not going to provide fertile ground for grand bargains. politicians like to talk about it. this is their way of saying, we're ready to do a deal, but it's those guys, they won't compromise. we think we'll see more of this piecemeal last minute compromises. >> and we're fating critical issues in the u.s. people might be aware of the fiscal cliff, but there's the continuing resolution, there's the sequester that goes into effect march 1st. should we hold our breath for compromise here? and, again, the issue is being forced because these are situations in which if there's no action, something still happens. >> that's right
.75%. declines on the part of bank of america and citi, down more than 1% apiece. technology, it follows the theme all throughout 2013 so far, technology is slightly lower. although we do have apple trading higher today. the fact that apple of late seems to be bucking the trend of the markets. whenever that trend happens to be. today is a downtrend, apple trading higher. certainly for the year, it has been that the markets rallied without apple. in spite of apple we should note. it is still the second largest company by market capitalization on the s&p. >> they're very close, exxon and apple. and we have to mention facebook. i mention facebook because the shares are down over 3%. adding to losses that have started to add up percentagewise for this company, after reported what were not great earnings. at least when you look at mobile and the growth there. again, that according to some who follow the company closely, who were not as perhaps enthused as they otherwise might have been. >> within the realm of this sort of large cap, technology leaders, google getting a downgrade today. google
of the day. right now reading the closing bell, new york city celebrating 25 years. they'll be appearing at carnegie hall. as we head towards the second hour, waiting for the interview with the ceo of clorox. on the second hour of "the closing bell." >>> and it is 4:00 on swallow street. do you know where your money is? i'm maria bartiromo on the floor of the new york stock exchange. the market posting the first triple digit loss on the dow industrials of the year after closing above 14,000 on friday. the market has retraced quite a bit of that today. we're also following a developing story at this hour. the justice department planning to file a suit against standard & poor's. mcgraw-hill clobbered today. also moody's down with it. and the dow down 130 points at the close tonight. about 1% lower at 13,880. nasdaq composite also gave up about 48 points as you can see there. almost 1.5% on the nasdaq. and the s&p 500 tonight down 17.5 points. joining me now is peter sorrentino, craig hodges, and our own rick santelli. good to have you on the program. peter, your thoughts on this lawsuit. h
, this is mike in the windy city giving you a chicago bears b-b-boo-yah. >> what's up? >> caller: if i short a stock, how long do i have to cover that short? >> forever. forever. that's one of the great things about shorting. stay short for as long as you want. if the stock goes up, they may ask you to put more money up, though, and that's where people get squeezed. okay. you've got to dig deep if you want deep profits. gross margins will guide you in figuring out the direction of a stock. and some things you'll only find on the conference calls. not the headlines. gross margins, that's on the call. stay with cramer. at a dry cleaner, we replaced people with a machine. what? customers didn't like it. so why do banks do it? hello? hello?! if your bank doesn't let you talk to a real person 24/7, you need an ally. hello? ally bank. your money needs an ally. how do you keep an older car running like new? you ask a ford customer. when they tell you that you need your oil changed you got to bring it in. if your tires need to be rotated, you have to get that done as well. jackie, tell me why somebo
. including for cities, states. we bank countries around the world. we hold deposits for a lot of countries and of huge size, which they can remove tomorrow. the biggest issue is i agree with people and they say banks shouldn't be too big to fail, i agree with you. we should have -- we should not call it resolution. we say we'll resolve banks and makes it sound like we're going to resolve you and you'll be okay at the end of it, no. it should be bankruptcy and the bank boards should be fired, managers should be fired, taxpayers should never pay and you should believe it. i want to call it bankruptcy for big, dumb banks. that's what i want to call it. there should be some form of all testament justice including clawback comp. it is true. a lot of these people walked away. they made a lot of money and they virtue a little brought the company down to its knees. but a lot of arguments used -- i believe that embedded in dodd frank is the right way to do it, liquidation, title two. it will take a little work to get it right. congress has to believe it. you have to believe it. it has to be somethi
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8